Ethical Hacking

What is Ethical Hacking?

Ethical hacking and ethical hacker are terms used to describe hacking performed by a company or individual to help identify potential threats on a computer or network. An ethical hacker attempts to bypass system security and search for any weak points that could be exploited by malicious hackers. This information is then used by the organization to improve the system security, in an effort to minimize or eliminate any potential attacks.

What constitutes ethical hacking?

For hacking to be deemed ethical, the hacker must obey the following rules:

  • Expressed (often written) permission to probe the network and attempt to identify potential security risks.
  • You respect the individual’s or company’s privacy.
  • You close out your work, not leaving anything open for you or someone else to exploit at a later time.
  • You let the software developer or hardware manufacturer know of any security vulnerabilities you locate in their software or hardware, if not already known by the company.

The term “ethical hacker” has received criticism at times from people who say that there is no such thing as an “ethical” hacker. Hacking is hacking, no matter how you look at it and those who do the hacking are commonly referred to as computer criminals or cyber criminals. However, the work that ethical hackers do for organizations has helped improve system security and can be said to be quite effective and successful. Individuals interested in becoming an ethical hacker can work towards a certification to become a Certified Ethical Hacker, or CEH. This certification is provided by the International Council of E-Commerce Consultants (EC-Council). The exam itself costs about $500 to take and consists of 125 multiple-choice questions in version 8 of the test (version 7 consisted of 150 multiple-choice questions).

An ethical hacker is a computer and networking expert who systematically attempts to penetrate a computer system or network on behalf of its owners for the purpose of finding security vulnerabilities that a malicious hacker could potentially exploit.

Ethical hackers use the same methods and techniques to test and bypass a system’s defenses as their less-principled counterparts, but rather than taking advantage of any vulnerabilities found, they document them and provide actionable advice on how to fix them so the organization can improve its overall security.

The purpose of ethical hacking is to evaluate the security of a network or system’s infrastructure. It entails finding and attempting to exploit any vulnerabilities to determine whether unauthorized access or other malicious activities are possible. Vulnerabilities tend to be found in poor or improper system configuration, known and unknown hardware or software flaws, and operational weaknesses in process or technical countermeasures. One of the first examples of ethical hacking occurred in the 1970s, when the United States government used groups of experts called “red teams” to hack its own computer systems. It has become a sizable sub-industry within the information security market and has expanded to also cover the physical and human elements of an organization’s defenses. A successful test doesn’t necessarily mean a network or system is 100% secure, but it should be able to withstand automated attacks and unskilled hackers.

Any organization that has a network connected to the Internet or provides an online service should consider subjecting it to a penetration test. Various standards such as thePayment Card Industry Data Security Standard require companies to conductpenetration testing from both an internal and external perspective on an annual basis and after any significant change in the infrastructure or applications. Many large companies, such as IBM, maintain employee teams of ethical hackers, while there are plenty of firms that offer ethical hacking as a service. Trustwave Holdings, Inc., has an Ethical Hacking Lab for attempting to exploit vulnerabilities that may be present in ATMs, point-of-sale devices and surveillance systems.

There are various organizations that provide standards and certifications for consultants that conduct penetration testing including:

Why You Should choose MultiTech Bulls Technologies for Ethical Hacking !

Our most popular information security and hacking training goes in-depth into the techniques us ed by malicious, black hat hackers with attention getting lectures and hands-on lab exercises. While these hacking skills can be used for malicious purposes, this class teaches you how to use the same hacking techniques to perform a white-hat, ethical hack, on your organization. You leave with the ability to quantitatively assess and measure threats to information assets; and discover where your organization is most vulnerable to hacking in this network security training course.

The goal of this course is to help you master a repeatable, documentable penetration testing methodology that can be used in an ethical penetration testing or hacking situation.
The most current, up-to-date Ethical Hacking training available in MultiTech Bulls Technologies.
Black Hat hackers are always changing their tactics to get one step ahead of the good guys. MultiTech Bulls Technologies updates our course materials regularly to ensure that you learn about the most current threats to your organization’s networks and systems.

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